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Leveraging Logistics Blog

InTek Freight and Logistics Blog

InTek Freight and Logistics is where companies come when faced with a freight and logistics problem within their supply chain.

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Truckload | Intermodal Transportation | Logistics & Supply Chain | International & Cross Border Logistics

How Fast Is Freight Shipping?

By: Kevin Baxter
May 2nd, 2022

Freight shipping can be as fast as it needs to be, or can take lengthy amounts of time depending on the mode of transportation, the distance it's traveling, the price paid by the shipper and other factors. If product is needed tomorrow, there are freight modes that can accommodate such a need. If a shipment is working on a looser timeline, a month or more is not unusual for international freight. The fastest freight mode in a vacuum is air freight, while the slowest is ocean freight (not counting some type of horse-drawn, non-powered method). Staying on the ground, truckload is faster than intermodal, though not as drastically as some may think. Delays can of course happen to any type of freight, whether they be weather-related, due to congestion at ports or terminals, because of staffing issues, tied to failed equipment or related in some way - commonly these days - to Covid-19. So, long story short, freight shipping can be fast, or it can be less fast. Let's get to some more precise numbers.

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Logistics & Supply Chain | International & Cross Border Logistics

How Does Global Warming Affect Shipping and Transportation?

By: Kevin Baxter
April 11th, 2022

Global warming is expected to affect shipping and transportation in a variety of ways - with some of those effects already being felt. Perhaps the most obvious shipping method to be affected by global warming is ocean freight, with impacts including sea level rise on ports, stronger storms and - on the other side of the ledger - melting ice caps opening previously unpassable shipping lanes. But those rising temperatures and more extreme weather can also affect other forms of transportation. Infrastructure like roads, bridges, railways and airports are susceptible to temperature-related wear and tear. Plus, hotter temperatures can make the vehicles themselves - trucks, ships, trains and planes - less efficient and more likely to overheat. And those hotter temperatures mean more loads may require temperature-controlled shipping to avoid spoilage.

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The Ins & Outs of Intermodal Transportation.

The Ins & Outs of Intermodal Transportation.

Everything you need to know about domestic intermodal and how to be successful implementing it into your logistics strategy. Gives tips, tricks and insights on intermodal and what to watch out for when converting from truckload to intermodal.

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Logistics & Supply Chain | International & Cross Border Logistics

Are ports prepared for sea level rise?

By: Kevin Baxter
April 8th, 2022

The potential impacts of climate change are many, but one that particularly affects ports is sea level rise. With oceans projected to rise 10-12 inches in the next 30 years on U.S. coastlines, ports must be prepared for both the day-to-day impacts and those when storms strike. Why should the average shipper or consumer be concerned about this? Because between 90 and 100% of all international freight passes through ocean ports. If major ports are unprepared for sea level rise, it will have major consequences on domestic and global supply chains. So that begs the question: Are ports prepared for sea level rise? The answer is, it depends. Some, like Los Angeles, seem well prepared, some are in the process of preparing and others may find themselves sunk. Regardless, there are steps ports can take to mitigate the impact of sea level rise.

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Logistics & Supply Chain | Logistics Service Provider | International & Cross Border Logistics

Air Freight vs Ocean Freight Carbon Footprint & Environmental Impact

By: Kevin Baxter
April 6th, 2022

When moving loads overseas, shippers have two options: air freight and ocean freight. And while there are factors like cost and speed to consider when choosing between modes, another key element that should go into shipping strategy is a shipping method's carbon footprint, AKA environmental impact. Comparing air freight vs. ocean freight - or sea freight if you prefer - purely based on carbon footprint reveals that moving cargo by ship offers significant advantages over doing so by plane. Depending on the statistics you cite, long-haul air freight can generate 47 times as much greenhouse gas emissions as ocean freight, per ton-mile. Put another way, airplanes emit 500 grams of CO2 per metric ton of freight per kilometer of transportation, while container ships emit only 10 to 40 grams of CO2 per kilometer. However, the overall environmental impact of air freight versus sea freight is a bit more cloudy.

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Truckload | Intermodal Transportation | Logistics & Supply Chain | Logistics Service Provider | International & Cross Border Logistics

What Is IPI in Shipping? About Interior or Inland Point Intermodal

By: Kevin Baxter
February 25th, 2022

Shipping and logistics are full of abbreviations and acronyms, and sometimes, the same one can stand for multiple phrases. In this case, IPI in shipping refers interchangeably to interior point intermodal and inland point intermodal. Regardless of which 'I' word is preferred, the term IPI covers inbound freight moves from a port to a shipper’s door within the country via a domestic or international intermodal container. So it's clear, the reason IPI can refer to either inland or interior is because the two words reference the same type of location. IPI shipments typically move via truck for short distances and intermodal rail for long distances. IPI and transloading are often intertwined, as while in some cases the load moves inland in its original ISO ocean container, it's often transloaded through a third party logistics provider (3PL) into a domestic intermodal container to continue its journey. The split may be about 50/50 in fact.

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Truckload | Intermodal Transportation | Logistics & Supply Chain | Logistics Service Provider | International & Cross Border Logistics | shipping costs | freight costs

What is dwell in shipping and how does it impact freight rates?

By: Kevin Baxter
February 23rd, 2022

Dwell is a shipping term that primarily refers to the amount of time a container spends at a facility like a terminal or port between when it's unloaded from one form of transport and moved out of the facility. The issue of dwell comes into play in container shipping, so it's primarily associated with intermodal and ocean freight. Costs related to dwell may impact freight rates already, or they may be added on as accessorial charges if containers overstay their allotted time - a term referred to as demurrage. Containers that dwell for a lengthy period at a terminal are considered aging cargo. Beyond the primary form of dwell, street dwell describes the period containers spend when pulled out of the terminal by truck - typically to avoid demurrage. At any rate, dwell is a common issue especially as supply chain constraints abound.

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Logistics & Supply Chain | Logistics Service Provider | International & Cross Border Logistics

What Does SSL Mean in Logistics?

By: Kevin Baxter
February 21st, 2022

When logistics pros or others in the shipping industry use the abbreviation SSL, they're referring to  a steamship line - sometimes with a space, i.e. steam ship line. Not to be confused with SSL in internet parlance (which refers to secure sockets layer), a steamship line owns and operates a fleet of maritime ships for the purpose of cargo movement. While the term SSL comes from a time when all of these freighters were steam-powered, that's no longer the case in most instances, leading  some to repurpose the abbreviation to stand for sea shipping line - or even simply shipping line (though that doesn't account for the extra 's') - to reflect the changing technology. Roughly 95% of all cargo travels at some point by ocean freight these days, so it's likely that SSL abbreviation will show up on an invoice you'll see somewhere.

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Logistics & Supply Chain | Logistics Service Provider | International & Cross Border Logistics | freight and shipping costs

What Is Drayage?

By: Kevin Baxter
February 18th, 2022

Drayage is a logistics term that refers the transport of goods over a short distance. More specifically, drayage is the movement of a container or trailer to or from the railroad intermodal terminal - or sometimes a port - to or from the customer's facility for loading or unloading. This movement/transport occurs most commonly via truck. The key distinction between drayage and truckload transport is simply the distance. Dray trucks take goods typically take goods either to a starting point of a longer journey or across the finish line. Either way, they're needed when a different form of transport - like rail or container ship, doesn't have a method to reach a warehouse or other customer facility. Drayage is also shorthand for the fee charged for the service.

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Logistics & Supply Chain | International & Cross Border Logistics | freight and shipping costs

What Is a Freight Hold?

By: Kevin Baxter
February 16th, 2022

A freight hold refers to a pause placed on a shipment for a variety of potential reasons and by a number of possible parties. In many circumstances, the hold is instituted due to unpaid fees, but in some, it may relate to a customs inspection or document issue.  A few top reasons for a freight hold include: Unpaid terminal fees Demurrage Incomplete or illegible documentation Statistical validation Customs commercial enforcement Customs vehicle and cargo inspection system (VACIS) The goal of every shipper and freight broker is to get loads to their destinations on time, so it's important to understand why freight holds can occur and address potential issues before a hold takes place.

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Logistics Service Provider | International & Cross Border Logistics

Lunar New Year, Olympics & Covid - A Supply Chain Trifecta in China

By: Kevin Baxter
February 2nd, 2022

With the supply chain still recovering from a crunch that started in 2021, the trifecta of the Lunar New Year celebration, the Beijing Olympics, and Covid-19 lockdowns in China are putting more pressure on shipping across the globe. China's Lunar New Year celebration is an annual "mark your calendars" timeframe for logistics pros, but the country's zero-Covid policy and hosting of the Winter Games on top of that make for a confluence of factors that have shippers and carriers on edge.

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